3 brands doing pride differently

It happens every year - Facebook feeds, store windows and TV ads become rainbow bedecked as brands use the LGBT pride flag to highlight their liberal credentials.

At Household we change our social media logos during Pride weekend in support of our LGBT+ colleagues. And when 70 per cent of LGBT+ people in the UK have concealed their sexual orientation for fear of a negative reaction, brands’ open support of LGBT+ is clearly a good thing. (Government Equalities Office, 2018). But for us, Pride is more than just a weekend. It’s about valuing people and celebrating our differences, every day of the year.
Brands need to go beyond one-off displays of support and produce authentic campaigns and year round initiatives that make a real impact. So this year we’re putting the spotlight on three brands that are going beyond the cliché gestures and slogans to support real work within the LGBT+ community.

REAL REPRESENTATION | AMERICAN APPAREL
They Is Ok
American Apparel went straight to customers for its campaign this year, launching an open casting call for Pride models with the aim of truly representing the LGBT+ community. The brand’s focus on diversity and true representation, links to the wider trend of democratising fashion that we are seeing.

LONG TERM LOYALTY | LEVIS
Be Proud, Be Bold, Be Yourself
As the first corporation to donate to HIV/AIDS causes, the brand has a long history of supporting the LGBT+ community. This year Levis is going beyond Pride apparel and getting out into the community. In London the brand hosted ‘Equality Always Fits’ celebrations, a night dedicated to dance, diversity and equality. The event gave a platform for international LGBT+ figures, from dancers to writers, to share their stories. And of course there was a voguing workshop involved.

PERSONAL PERSPECTIVES | L’OREAL
Signs of Pride
L’Oréal focused on its own LGBT+ team members inviting four artists to learn about the employee’s personal stories and transform each unique perspective into an eye-catching design. The art was turned into signs for the New York City Pride March, where hundreds of L’Oréal USA employees marched with the proud messages in tow.
 
Images courtesy of American Apparel, Levis and L’Oreal.

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