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The rise of 1-2-1 retail

Innovation and inspiration to kick start your week


THE (IN)ACCESSIBLE STORE
Cocona | US
300 ft up a cliff in Colorado’s Eldorado Canyon, advanced material manufacturer Cocona opened a two-day pop up giving out clothing from Adidas, Rab, and Point6, all made from Cocona fabrics. The store could only be accessed by those with the determination and skills to scale a near-vertical rock wall.
Household takeout: Engaging directly with your target customer doesn’t get more intimate than this. Find kindred spirits amongst a niche customer group by developing a unique format that serves only a few, but impresses many.
 

LOCALISATION GETS ROBOTIC
Adidas | Global
Adidas’s robotically-made small batch sneaker is crafted to meet the needs of runners in each city. Launching in London, the AM4 series are manufactured at the brands robotic ‘Speedfactory’ which allows small, responsive runs. This revolution of manufacturing means a new city version can be crafted and released each week.
Household takeout: Using timely phrases such as ‘happily data driven’, ‘open source co-creation’, ‘hyper flexible’ and ‘localised’ calls attention to the human benefits of robotic creation.
 

MALL (NOT) FOR ALL
Household’s founders are off on an experience safari in Los Angeles next week. One stop on the trail is Platform Mall, the local haven which has a strict tenant policy to maintain surprise and delight every visit. Brands need to bring a unique proposition to the mall and the locality, meaning the centre has a combination of unique brands, unusual retail concepts or restaurants new to the LA area. The Aesop cosmetics store is the first local store with day spa services, and the Blue Bottle coffee shop next door includes an upstairs bookshop alcove curated by New York City-based One Grand Books.
 

DATA WITH A HUMAN TOUCH
3x faster sales when data and digital tech create a personalised experience (Boston Consulting Group, 2017)
Son of a Tailor | Copenhagen
Copenhagen-based start up Son of a Tailor uses a combination of user-input data, algorithms and hand-made, local production to deliver the ‘perfect t-shirt’. Unique to every customer, the brand aims to cater to the unmet needs of the individuals taste and body shape. The t-shirt is finished by being hand signed by the person who made it and addressed to the recipient.
Household takeout: Personalisation doesn’t have to be the domain of algorithms and cold tech, smart brands will use it as an opportunity to bring joy and delight to a tactile shopping experience.

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